You are here: Home Grid Made Easy Typographical Conventions
Personal tools
Views

Typographical conventions

In addition to the standard writing conventions, “Grid Made Easy” makes use of the following.

Representing computer input and output

Text shown in a typewriter-like font (e.g., monospaced) is used to represent:

  • Output from the computer; this is exactly what you should see on (part of) your monitor, except when explicitly noted.
  • Input to the computer, that you should type exactly as shown, except for the few exceptions that are detailed below.

Synopsis of shell commands

The synopsis of shell commands is usually written in one of the following forms:

command-name [options] "argument" ["arguments" …]

command-name [options] ARGUMENT  [ARGUMENTS …]

command-name [options] <argument> [<argument> …]

Here's the meaning of parts:

command-name
You should type this exactly as shown after the shell prompt (either $ or #, depending on whether you have root super-user privileges or not).
[…]?
Square brackets enclose optional parts.
[options]?
Command line options; these begin with a dash - character. Which options are available and their significance is usually detailed in a separate table in the “Grid Made Easy” text, or described in paragraphs following the synopsis.
ARGUMENT

A word spelt all in capital letters denotes an argument to the command. You should substitute an actual value for it. For instance, when you read:

edg-job-submit [options] JDL-FILE

then in actual invocation of the edg-job-submit command, you should substitute the path name of a .jdl file for JDL-FILE:

edg-job-submit /tmp/hello.jdl
"argument"

A word enclosed in straight double quotes " denotes an argument to the command. You should substitute an actual value for it. For instance, when you read:

export PATH=/"path to java directory"/bin:$PATH

Then, if "path to java directory" is /var/java you should actually type:

export PATH=/var/java/bin:$PATH
<argument>

A word enclosed in angle brackets < and > denotes an argument to the command. You should substitute an actual value for it. For instance, when you read:

edg-job-submit <jdl file>

then you should replace the string <jdl file> with the path name of a JDL file, for instance:

edg-job-submit /tmp/hello.jdl

Command-line session samples

A typical command line session sample is typeset like this:

$ lcg-infosites --vo gridats -v 1 se
grid002.oat.ts.astro.it
egrid-ce-01.egrid.it
gridts01.grid.elettra.trieste.it

Lines starting with the character ``$`` or ``#`` (only the first one, in the the above sample) represent the input that you provide to the computer. You should type everything following the $ character.

Other lines represent computer output, which you will see in response to the input you typed.

Sometimes, a command line is too long to fit into one line of typeset text: we break the command line in smaller parts, signalling the break with a \ mark at the end of line, like in the following example:

$ lcg-info --list-ce \
      --query 'TotalCPUs=10' \
      --attrs 'TotalCPUs,FreeCPUs' \
      --vo gridats

The above command should be typed all in one line, and omitting the \, like this:

$ lcg-info --list-ce --query 'TotalCPUs=10' --attrs 'TotalCPUs,FreeCPUs' --vo gridats

Lines starting with the character ``#`` represent commands that you should give as the root user, that is, from an account that has administrator privileges. These are configuration commands that are used only when installing the Grid software; they are not needed for everyday Grid usage.

Paragraphs tagged for specific reading

Some paragraphs are intended only for a specific audience.

VO ``egrid`` only:

Paragraphs tagged this way are intended for users belonging to the egrid VO only; users from other VO's may omit reading.

VO ``gridats`` only:

Paragraphs tagged this way are intended for users belonging to the gridats VO only; users from other VO's may omit reading.

Tags for important remarks

Some paragraphs denote special emphasis.

Note

Note:

Paragraphs typeset this way denote subtle points that you should be aware of, as they might be counter-intuitive or produce unwanted effects.

Warning

Paragraphs tagged this way denote something that you should be especially careful about; for instance, it might alert you that a certain option might have a disruptive effect on your work.


« June 2017 »
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930
 

Powered by Plone This site conforms to the following standards: